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Rick Wilson

The Saturday between Good Friday and Easter Sunday is the often-neglected day of Holy Week. “Dark Saturday” it is sometimes called and, like its name, it is a day that tends to get lost in the shadows. The Saturday between Good Friday and Easter Sunday is the often-neglected day of Holy Week. “Dark Saturday” it […] Read More

Last week many Americans learned a new word: dissemble. The person who introduced the good word was our president, George W. Bush. In a May 31 press conference where the president addressed Amnesty International’s damning commentary on recent U.S. treatment of prisoners Mr. Bush said, “It seemed like to me they based some of their […] Read More

The Saturday between Good Friday and Easter Sunday is the often-neglected day of Holy Week. “Dark Saturday” it is sometimes called and, like its name, it is a day that tends to get lost in the shadows. The first shadows that tend to obscure Dark Saturday are those cast by the cross of Good Friday. […] Read More

How was it that a German Lutheran pastor, once noted for his pacifism, would die in his 39th year, convicted of high treason against the government of his beloved Germany? Only days before, Nazis had discovered Admiral Canaris’s diary that detailed the work of “Operation 7,” part of the German Resistance Movement that boldly attempted […] Read More

The bright light of Easter casts some very long shadows—because the horror of crucifixion began at midday on Friday and lingered until dawn on Sunday. That is the story of the Christian Gospels. Jesus of Nazareth dies on Friday as a result of a Roman decree issued by the governor of Judea, Pontius Pilate. When […] Read More

Once the lens of dispensational theology is ground and polished, then all of history is seen through that lens. Scripture is reorganized and read exclusively through a dispensational view of history. Such beliefs are directly related to dispensationalism, an early-19th-century theological development in England. In recent years and months, dispensationalism’s influences have become particularly ominous. […] Read More

How is it that the name of a saint, the bearer of Christianity to Ireland, has become synonymous with open beer taps, wild dancing and parades? Today is a good day for such a question, and a better day to explore the narrow border that puts saint and sinner so close to one another. Life […] Read More

Revelry and solemnity will converge this week, if only for a moment. In the convergence, a great reversal occurs. We reclaim the nearly lost image of the Christ as the one who joined The Party. And then we set aside the passions of the celebration to begin the long wait to welcome, again, the one […] Read More

Tillich was one of the giants of 20th-century Protestant theology. The bulk of his work was directed toward constructing a thoroughly modern theology that could stand before the intellectual rigors of philosophy and science that had threatened to eclipse the integrity of Christian faith. Events early in Paul Tillich’s life, however, had a distinctly political […] Read More

Give in to the biting winds of winter, pulling up your collar and pulling down your chin, listening to the call to silence. Perhaps it is all of the above. Slower living gives us time for reflection, and reflection calls for quiet. The precise outline of a bare tree against a clear sky begs us […] Read More