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Pew Charitable Trusts

Criminal justice reforms have reduced overcrowded U.S. prisons and jails, but unaddressed issues within probation and parole have led to overwhelmed community supervision systems and increased recidivism. […] Read More

The number of persons with a severe mental illness (SMI) in U.S. jails is growing, requiring treatment services most jails are unprepared to offer, according to a report by The Pew Charitable Trusts released on Jan. 24. “Although the central purpose of jails is to detain people who engage in criminal behavior and pose a […] Read More

Efficient and effective integration of healthcare with other rehabilitative initiatives is essential to reducing recidivism, according a report from The Pew Charitable Trusts released on Oct. 18. “Emerging research suggests that underlying health issues, particularly substance use disorders and mental illness, contribute to incarceration and recidivism, and that treatment, combined with seamless care continuity for […] Read More

Criminal justice reforms in 33 U.S. states have reduced the overall prison population, Pew Charitable Trust reported on its podcast, “After the Facts.” Crime rates also have declined. The U.S. prison population began expanding rapidly in the 1970s, peaking around 2007 with 1 in 100 persons being imprisoned, podcast host Dan LeDuc noted in his […] Read More

The punishment rate is a more nuanced assessment of criminal justice trends than the imprisonment rate, according to The Pew Charitable Trusts. The imprisonment rate is calculated based on the number of inmates per 100,000 people and is the most widely used data for assessing the criminal justice system. The report suggests that states and […] Read More