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Carol Ann Vaughn

Baptists of the Year

Time Magazine has selected a man or woman as the person of the year since 1927. President Bush is the 2004 recipient. Past recipients have included Mohandas Gandhi in 1930, Adolf Hitler in 1938, Joseph Stalin in 1939, Lyndon Johnson in 1967 and Pope John Paul II in 1994. Three Baptists have been recipients: Martin […] Read More

Transformational leadership does not see results overnight. This may be one of the most frustrating aspects of any activism. How does one remain optimistically focused on a goal in the face of strongly rooted obstacles and unanticipated challenges? In her books Helping Yourself Help Others and Helping Someone with Mental Illness, former first lady Rosalynn […] Read More

“It won’t make a difference.” “You can’t change the system.” “That’s just the way things are.” Have you ever heard these words? Have you ever uttered these words? Have you ever heard these words? Have you ever uttered these words?  <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = “urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office” /> If so, how do we influence, change—indeed […] Read More

The majority of Americans who attend church and are involved in Christian discipleship are women. The majority of Americans most likely to engage in daily devotions, to pray and to read the Bible are women. The majority of Americans who attend church and are involved in Christian discipleship are women. The majority of Americans most […] Read More

The issue of women’s roles, now a non-issue for American Baptists, remained a hot topic among Southern Baptists, Independent Baptists and National Baptists in the 1990s. Out of the SBC controversies of the 1980s, the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship formed in 1990-91, deliberately affirming women in all aspects of Gospel ministry, including proclamation. By 1993 over […] Read More

One year after the SBC revised its “Baptist Faith and Message” in 1963, Addie Davis became the first Southern Baptist woman to be ordained to the ministry. Seven years passed before another SBC church ordained a woman minister, Shirley Carter. Numerous SBC men affirmed the ordination of women, but bitter opposition remained among some SBC […] Read More

In 1904, Southern Baptist Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, allowed four women to attend classes without credit or participation in class discussion. Baptists in California hired Amy Lee Stockton as state evangelist. Dubbed “the Girl Preacher,” Stockton led revivals for forty years throughout the West. At the same time, according to Auburn Distinguished University Professor Wayne […] Read More

Increasing numbers of independent and Southern Baptists were highly suspicious of Baptist women’s involvement in the broader women’s movement in America and Europe. Nevertheless, enough SBC men voted to accept women messengers with voting privileges in 1918, two years before passage of the 19th Amendment that enfranchised American women. Baptists in California hired Amy Lee […] Read More

The first great wave of Baptist women mission volunteers coincided with the first American movement for women’s rights, in the 1840s. At that time mainstream American religion prescribed the role of “domestic evangelists” for women. Their ministry was to occur in the private “sphere” of the home, “separate” from men. As Baptists competed with Methodists […] Read More

Baptist women participated in both the First and Second Great Awakenings in America. Both revival movements produced many Baptist women preachers, prophets, educators and missionaries. From Freewill Baptists, Mary Savage and Sally Parsons preached to New England crowds in the 1790s. The press touted revival evangelist Clarissa Danforth as the “sensation preacher of this decade” […] Read More