Skip to site content

Author Sue Smith

Sue Smith is a Cooperative Baptist Fellowship field personnel who works with LUCHA Ministries in Fredericksburg, Virginia.

Even though everyone has the right to an education, we take literacy and education for granted in the U.S. In many Central American countries, however, literacy rates are low at approximately 75 percent. […] Read More

While many people migrate to the U.S. to flee gang violence, many others from indigenous communities in Mexico are fleeing poverty, a crushing and systemic problem rooted in decades of injustice and exploitation. […] Read More

Parents don’t entrust their children into the care of strangers, no matter how attractive the circumstances. So how did we as a nation decide it’s a good thing to take children away from their parents? […] Read More

A recent Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond’s Mission Immersion Experience to El Salvador brought to light an issue that I had given little thought to – internally displaced persons (IDPs) within the country of El Salvador itself. While we were there, the announcement was made that the U.S. was ending temporary protected status for Salvadorans […] Read More

When we look at issues of migration and human rights in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), we see that there’s still much work to be done on our part on behalf of immigrants and refugees. And today, it’s particularly important that we add voices from the faith community to the discussion of immigration […] Read More

It was never their intention to be undocumented immigrants. Yerendi Roblero, 22, was only 6 months old when her parents brought her to the U.S. She is a DREAMer and a DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) recipient. DACA has allowed Yerendi to obtain work authorization in the United States, a drivers’ license and access […] Read More

How do you feel when your parents migrate to the U.S. and leave you behind? This wasn’t an easy question for students to answer in El Salvador. Seven of us, all Baptists, visited an inner-city high school, Instituto Isaac Newton, located in the heart of San Salvador. We were seeking to better understand this country […] Read More

A Salvadoran immigrant whom I’ll call Marcos caused me to dig deeper in order to understand his home country. Since then, I’ve studied the history of El Salvador and I’ve now visited there twice. I’ve made Salvadoran friends both in the U.S. and in El Salvador. It’s fairly easy for non-immigrant Americans to look at […] Read More