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Author Stuart Blythe

Stuart Blythe is associate professor of the John Gladstone Chair in Preaching and Worship at Acadia Divinity College, Nova Scotia.

I switched on the news Tuesday morning to hear of the “presumed terrorist” attack at the Berlin Christmas market. My immediate thoughts were as follows: The Christmas market is so much a traditional part of German culture and tradition; here in the Netherlands I have had Dutch friends say that the German Christmas markets are […] Read More

The Apostles Creed jumps from the birth of Jesus to his suffering and death, and misses out on his life. This raises interesting questions about the significance of the life of Jesus and its practical ethical significance in terms of offering the way of Jesus as a model for discipleship as an essential aspect of […] Read More

There are four interdependent areas that contribute to “moral formation,” according to Louise Kretzschmar. Kretzschmar is professor of theological ethics at the University of South Africa; the International Baptist Theological Study Centre in Amsterdam was pleased to welcome her recently as a visiting scholar. The four areas contributing to moral formation are being, relationships, knowing […] Read More

One of the ways in which Christians develop a particular understanding of “Christian” leadership is through a study of biblical characters. A quick look suggests that the following names are often in or near the top 10 of favorites: Abraham, Joseph, Moses, Joshua, Deborah, Gideon, Solomon, David, Daniel, Esther, Nehemiah, Jesus, Peter and Paul. I […] Read More

An ethical response to the Earth requires the use of imagination for proper “knowing,” says Norman Wirzba in his book, “From Nature to Creation: A Christian Vision for Understanding and Loving Our World.” In advancing this argument, he refers to a quotation from Wendell Berry’s “Life is a Miracle: An Essay Against Modern Superstition,” where […] Read More

Definitions can kill a thing. Yet, it can take more than a sign (such as a name), but some shared understanding of what that sign signifies, to allow for a discussion that goes beyond the surface. A surface (thin) conversation may be a necessary starting point but if this is to thicken into something more, […] Read More

Sometimes after teaching or preaching about figures I may wish to describe as “prophetic,” people have sometimes commented, “But what are the big issues today?” This question is asked no doubt with the desire that “we,” the church, may be prophetic today. Here are a few thoughts on being prophetic: 1. It is prophets who […] Read More