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Author Doug Weaver

Doug Weaver is Director of Undergraduate Studies and Professor of Baptist Studies in the Department of Religion at Baylor University in Waco, Texas.

Puritan theologian Roger Williams forcefully declared that Jesus should not be associated with our lust for forced conformity and reliance upon civil government. His writings may be messy and difficult, but they’re worth a read. […] Read More

I often have college students do an essay on race relations and the Christian heritage in light of reading Martin Luther King, Jr. Most students express an appreciation of King’s life and work but many add: “We are glad that the issue of race relations is over. We are glad that we don’t have to […] Read More

I was introduced to a meeting of a rural association by a member of a church where I was doing an interim pastorate. The man told the crowd, “We are glad to have preaching to us tonight, Dr. Doug Weaver. He teaches at the college down the road. But we don’t call him doctor. We […] Read More

Soon after his election as president of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in 1993, Albert Mohler declared his intent to pursue only faculty members who would restrict the pastorate to males. Molly Marshall–at the time a theology professor at the seminary–and a few other women responded by organizing a protest. They invited women to fill […] Read More

The Catholic Spirit

The divisions within Protestantism have bedeviled believers ever since the Reformation in the 16th century. In his recent novel, The Last Juror, John Grisham pokes fun at these divisions as he describes the life of Willie Traynor, the young owner of a small-town newspaper. Traynor decided to visit every church in Ford County, Mississippi, and […] Read More

The ordination of women as ministers–deacons, pastors and others–is controversial in Baptist life. A few Baptists are open, many (especially in the South) are adamantly opposed and some affirm women as ministers for congregations other than their own. During the last year, I participated in the ordination of two women and have joined a church […] Read More

The ordination of women as ministers–deacons, pastors and others–is controversial in Baptist life. A few Baptists are open, many (especially in the South) are adamantly opposed and some affirm women as ministers for congregations other than their own. During the last year, I participated in the ordination of two women and have joined a church […] Read More

Religious liberty has been a hallmark distinctive in Baptist life. Thomas Helwys, Roger Williams and John Leland are familiar figures in the pantheon of Baptist “heroes” who are known for their support of freedom. At the institutional level, the Baptist World Alliance has been a similar “hero” for almost 100 years. The First Baptist World […] Read More

Baptists and Women Deacons

Southern Baptists and women have again been in the news recently. New Southern Baptist literature, the Baptist Center for Ethics has reported, is critical of the practice of women deacons. Read that again, not the old tirades against women pastors, but the next item in the evolving fundamentalist agenda of the Southern Baptist Convention: no […] Read More

Baptist history is filled with many fascinating but little-known stories. The name of Martha Stainback Wilson (1834-1919) is most likely unknown except to the most dedicated readers of the history of “women’s work” in the South. I discovered her by accident while working on another project. Eulogized at her death as a Confederate heroine (she […] Read More